Best PSE index (PSEi) stocks of 2012


Whenever local stocks are reported on business news channels and dailies, a certain statistic is usually cited to assess if the market’s performance is up or down. This number is the Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) — a weighted index of the trading day’s performance of 30 publicly-listed companies. (See Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) composition in 2012)

Whenever local stocks are reported on business news channels and dailies, a certain statistic is usually cited to assess if the market’s performance is up or down. This number is the Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) — a weighted index of the trading day’s performance of 30 publicly-listed companies. (See Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) composition in 2012)

Whenever local stocks are reported on business news channels and dailies, a certain statistic is usually cited to assess if the market’s performance is up or down. This number is the Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) — a weighted index of the trading day’s performance of 30 publicly-listed companies. (See Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) composition in 2012)

Whenever local stocks are reported on business news channels and dailies, a certain statistic is usually cited to assess if the market’s performance is up or down. This number is the Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) — a weighted index of the trading day’s performance of 30 publicly-listed companies. (See Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) composition in 2012)

Whenever local stocks are reported on business news channels and dailies, a certain statistic is usually cited to assess if the market’s performance is up or down. This number is the Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) — a weighted index of the trading day’s performance of 30 publicly-listed companies. (See Philippine Stock Exchange index (PSEi) composition in 2012)

The closing prices and market capitalization of these 30 stocks are considered in the computation of the PSE index. This figure serves as barometer of the Philippine stock market and, ultimately, the overall national economy. If the PSEi is consistently declining, the general sentiment of stock market investors is expected to be negative, and with it comes a pessimistic view of the country’s future growth.

If the PSEi is increasing — similar to what we saw in 2012 — overall market sentiment becomes positive and, in turn, expectations on the general economy is also optimistic.

We have previously reported that the PSEi grew 32.95% in 2012. This means if you invested in the index from the start of last year, your P100,000 would be worth P132,950 by the end of the year.

In the absence, however, of exchange traded funds (ETF) that track the Philippine Stock Exchange index, it is currently difficult for the common investor to “invest in the index.”

Yes, there are a few mutual funds and UITFs that follow the PSEi, but these “index funds” are not as mainstream as the other funds being offered by banks and investment companies. Worse, these so-called “index funds” sometimes deviate from tracking the index and are being managed actively, instead of passively — putting into question the very essence of it being an “index fund.”

Similarly, if the investor wants to “beat the market,” he or she can resort to active management by choosing specific stocks that are part of the PSEi, instead of merely investing in the 30-company index.

As seen below in the performance of the 30 PSEi companies last year, around half of these stocks outperformed the 32.95% growth of the index. Around one-tenth of the stocks ended in positive territory, albeit lower than the average PSEi performance. However, there were still seven (7) out of 30 stocks in the index that declined in value in 2012.

The full-year 2012 performance of the 30 stocks comprising the PSEi is shown below. The 2011 full-year return of the PSEi stocks is also shown for comparative purposes.

The 13 stocks that managed to outperform the 2012 PSEi’s average growth of 32.95% are:

  1. ROBINSONS LAND CORP (RLC): +83.63%
  2. UNIVERSAL ROBINA CORP (URC): +74.69%
  3. AYALA LAND INC (ALI): +74.47%
  4. BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS (BPI): +72.10%
  5. AYALA CORPORATION (AC): +66.24%
  6. MANILA WATER CO. (MWC): +64.95%
  7. MEGAWORLD CORP (MEG): +62.94%
  8. ALLIANCE GLOBAL INC. (AGI): +62.09%
  9. JG SUMMIT HOLDINGS (JGS): +57.06%
  10. FIRST GEN CORP (FGEN): +52.53%
  11. SM INVESTMENTS CORP (SM): +51.42%
  12. METROBANK (MBT): +50.11%
  13. INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINAL SERVICES (ICT): +39.62%

The seven (7) stocks that lost value in 2012 include:

  1. PHILEX MINING CO (PX): -28.15%
  2. PETRON CORP (PCOR): -16.98%
  3. SM DEVELOPMENT CORP (SMDC): -13.38%
  4. SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION (SMC): -9.76%
  5. BELLE CORP (BE): -4.33%
  6. GLOBE TELECOM (GLO): -3.62%
  7. PLDT (TEL): -0.47%

The complete listing of the 2012 and 2011 full-year returns of the 30 companies comprising the PSEi is as follows.

[TABLE=191]

You should read these other interesting articles:

The closing prices and market capitalization of these 30 stocks are considered in the computation of the PSE index. This figure serves as barometer of the Philippine stock market and, ultimately, the overall national economy. If the PSEi is consistently declining, the general sentiment of stock market investors is expected to be negative, and with it comes a pessimistic view of the country’s future growth.

If the PSEi is increasing — similar to what we saw in 2012 — overall market sentiment becomes positive and, in turn, expectations on the general economy is also optimistic.

We have previously reported that the PSEi grew 32.95% in 2012. This means if you invested in the index from the start of last year, your P100,000 would be worth P132,950 by the end of the year.

In the absence, however, of exchange traded funds (ETF) that track the Philippine Stock Exchange index, it is currently difficult for the common investor to “invest in the index.”

Yes, there are a few mutual funds and UITFs that follow the PSEi, but these “index funds” are not as mainstream as the other funds being offered by banks and investment companies. Worse, these so-called “index funds” sometimes deviate from tracking the index and are being managed actively, instead of passively — putting into question the very essence of it being an “index fund.”

Similarly, if the investor wants to “beat the market,” he or she can resort to active management by choosing specific stocks that are part of the PSEi, instead of merely investing in the 30-company index.

As seen below in the performance of the 30 PSEi companies last year, around half of these stocks outperformed the 32.95% growth of the index. Around one-tenth of the stocks ended in positive territory, albeit lower than the average PSEi performance. However, there were still seven (7) out of 30 stocks in the index that declined in value in 2012.

The full-year 2012 performance of the 30 stocks comprising the PSEi is shown below. The 2011 full-year return of the PSEi stocks is also shown for comparative purposes.

The 13 stocks that managed to outperform the 2012 PSEi’s average growth of 32.95% are:

  1. ROBINSONS LAND CORP (RLC): +83.63%
  2. UNIVERSAL ROBINA CORP (URC): +74.69%
  3. AYALA LAND INC (ALI): +74.47%
  4. BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS (BPI): +72.10%
  5. AYALA CORPORATION (AC): +66.24%
  6. MANILA WATER CO. (MWC): +64.95%
  7. MEGAWORLD CORP (MEG): +62.94%
  8. ALLIANCE GLOBAL INC. (AGI): +62.09%
  9. JG SUMMIT HOLDINGS (JGS): +57.06%
  10. FIRST GEN CORP (FGEN): +52.53%
  11. SM INVESTMENTS CORP (SM): +51.42%
  12. METROBANK (MBT): +50.11%
  13. INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINAL SERVICES (ICT): +39.62%

The seven (7) stocks that lost value in 2012 include:

  1. PHILEX MINING CO (PX): -28.15%
  2. PETRON CORP (PCOR): -16.98%
  3. SM DEVELOPMENT CORP (SMDC): -13.38%
  4. SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION (SMC): -9.76%
  5. BELLE CORP (BE): -4.33%
  6. GLOBE TELECOM (GLO): -3.62%
  7. PLDT (TEL): -0.47%

The complete listing of the 2012 and 2011 full-year returns of the 30 companies comprising the PSEi is as follows.

[TABLE=191]

You should read these other interesting articles:

The closing prices and market capitalization of these 30 stocks are considered in the computation of the PSE index. This figure serves as barometer of the Philippine stock market and, ultimately, the overall national economy. If the PSEi is consistently declining, the general sentiment of stock market investors is expected to be negative, and with it comes a pessimistic view of the country’s future growth.

If the PSEi is increasing — similar to what we saw in 2012 — overall market sentiment becomes positive and, in turn, expectations on the general economy is also optimistic.

We have previously reported that the PSEi grew 32.95% in 2012. This means if you invested in the index from the start of last year, your P100,000 would be worth P132,950 by the end of the year.

In the absence, however, of exchange traded funds (ETF) that track the Philippine Stock Exchange index, it is currently difficult for the common investor to “invest in the index.”

Yes, there are a few mutual funds and UITFs that follow the PSEi, but these “index funds” are not as mainstream as the other funds being offered by banks and investment companies. Worse, these so-called “index funds” sometimes deviate from tracking the index and are being managed actively, instead of passively — putting into question the very essence of it being an “index fund.”

Similarly, if the investor wants to “beat the market,” he or she can resort to active management by choosing specific stocks that are part of the PSEi, instead of merely investing in the 30-company index.

As seen below in the performance of the 30 PSEi companies last year, around half of these stocks outperformed the 32.95% growth of the index. Around one-tenth of the stocks ended in positive territory, albeit lower than the average PSEi performance. However, there were still seven (7) out of 30 stocks in the index that declined in value in 2012.

The full-year 2012 performance of the 30 stocks comprising the PSEi is shown below. The 2011 full-year return of the PSEi stocks is also shown for comparative purposes.

The 13 stocks that managed to outperform the 2012 PSEi’s average growth of 32.95% are:

  1. ROBINSONS LAND CORP (RLC): +83.63%
  2. UNIVERSAL ROBINA CORP (URC): +74.69%
  3. AYALA LAND INC (ALI): +74.47%
  4. BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS (BPI): +72.10%
  5. AYALA CORPORATION (AC): +66.24%
  6. MANILA WATER CO. (MWC): +64.95%
  7. MEGAWORLD CORP (MEG): +62.94%
  8. ALLIANCE GLOBAL INC. (AGI): +62.09%
  9. JG SUMMIT HOLDINGS (JGS): +57.06%
  10. FIRST GEN CORP (FGEN): +52.53%
  11. SM INVESTMENTS CORP (SM): +51.42%
  12. METROBANK (MBT): +50.11%
  13. INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINAL SERVICES (ICT): +39.62%

The seven (7) stocks that lost value in 2012 include:

  1. PHILEX MINING CO (PX): -28.15%
  2. PETRON CORP (PCOR): -16.98%
  3. SM DEVELOPMENT CORP (SMDC): -13.38%
  4. SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION (SMC): -9.76%
  5. BELLE CORP (BE): -4.33%
  6. GLOBE TELECOM (GLO): -3.62%
  7. PLDT (TEL): -0.47%

The complete listing of the 2012 and 2011 full-year returns of the 30 companies comprising the PSEi is as follows.

[TABLE=191]

You should read these other interesting articles:

The closing prices and market capitalization of these 30 stocks are considered in the computation of the PSE index. This figure serves as barometer of the Philippine stock market and, ultimately, the overall national economy. If the PSEi is consistently declining, the general sentiment of stock market investors is expected to be negative, and with it comes a pessimistic view of the country’s future growth.

If the PSEi is increasing — similar to what we saw in 2012 — overall market sentiment becomes positive and, in turn, expectations on the general economy is also optimistic.

We have previously reported that the PSEi grew 32.95% in 2012. This means if you invested in the index from the start of last year, your P100,000 would be worth P132,950 by the end of the year.

In the absence, however, of exchange traded funds (ETF) that track the Philippine Stock Exchange index, it is currently difficult for the common investor to “invest in the index.”

Yes, there are a few mutual funds and UITFs that follow the PSEi, but these “index funds” are not as mainstream as the other funds being offered by banks and investment companies. Worse, these so-called “index funds” sometimes deviate from tracking the index and are being managed actively, instead of passively — putting into question the very essence of it being an “index fund.”

Similarly, if the investor wants to “beat the market,” he or she can resort to active management by choosing specific stocks that are part of the PSEi, instead of merely investing in the 30-company index.

As seen below in the performance of the 30 PSEi companies last year, around half of these stocks outperformed the 32.95% growth of the index. Around one-tenth of the stocks ended in positive territory, albeit lower than the average PSEi performance. However, there were still seven (7) out of 30 stocks in the index that declined in value in 2012.

The full-year 2012 performance of the 30 stocks comprising the PSEi is shown below. The 2011 full-year return of the PSEi stocks is also shown for comparative purposes.

The 13 stocks that managed to outperform the 2012 PSEi’s average growth of 32.95% are:

  1. ROBINSONS LAND CORP (RLC): +83.63%
  2. UNIVERSAL ROBINA CORP (URC): +74.69%
  3. AYALA LAND INC (ALI): +74.47%
  4. BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS (BPI): +72.10%
  5. AYALA CORPORATION (AC): +66.24%
  6. MANILA WATER CO. (MWC): +64.95%
  7. MEGAWORLD CORP (MEG): +62.94%
  8. ALLIANCE GLOBAL INC. (AGI): +62.09%
  9. JG SUMMIT HOLDINGS (JGS): +57.06%
  10. FIRST GEN CORP (FGEN): +52.53%
  11. SM INVESTMENTS CORP (SM): +51.42%
  12. METROBANK (MBT): +50.11%
  13. INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINAL SERVICES (ICT): +39.62%

The seven (7) stocks that lost value in 2012 include:

  1. PHILEX MINING CO (PX): -28.15%
  2. PETRON CORP (PCOR): -16.98%
  3. SM DEVELOPMENT CORP (SMDC): -13.38%
  4. SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION (SMC): -9.76%
  5. BELLE CORP (BE): -4.33%
  6. GLOBE TELECOM (GLO): -3.62%
  7. PLDT (TEL): -0.47%

The complete listing of the 2012 and 2011 full-year returns of the 30 companies comprising the PSEi is as follows.

[TABLE=191]

You should read these other interesting articles:

The closing prices and market capitalization of these 30 stocks are considered in the computation of the PSE index. This figure serves as barometer of the Philippine stock market and, ultimately, the overall national economy. If the PSEi is consistently declining, the general sentiment of stock market investors is expected to be negative, and with it comes a pessimistic view of the country’s future growth.

If the PSEi is increasing — similar to what we saw in 2012 — overall market sentiment becomes positive and, in turn, expectations on the general economy is also optimistic.

We have previously reported that the PSEi grew 32.95% in 2012. This means if you invested in the index from the start of last year, your P100,000 would be worth P132,950 by the end of the year.

In the absence, however, of exchange traded funds (ETF) that track the Philippine Stock Exchange index, it is currently difficult for the common investor to “invest in the index.”

Yes, there are a few mutual funds and UITFs that follow the PSEi, but these “index funds” are not as mainstream as the other funds being offered by banks and investment companies. Worse, these so-called “index funds” sometimes deviate from tracking the index and are being managed actively, instead of passively — putting into question the very essence of it being an “index fund.”

Similarly, if the investor wants to “beat the market,” he or she can resort to active management by choosing specific stocks that are part of the PSEi, instead of merely investing in the 30-company index.

As seen below in the performance of the 30 PSEi companies last year, around half of these stocks outperformed the 32.95% growth of the index. Around one-tenth of the stocks ended in positive territory, albeit lower than the average PSEi performance. However, there were still seven (7) out of 30 stocks in the index that declined in value in 2012.

The full-year 2012 performance of the 30 stocks comprising the PSEi is shown below. The 2011 full-year return of the PSEi stocks is also shown for comparative purposes.

The 13 stocks that managed to outperform the 2012 PSEi’s average growth of 32.95% are:

  1. ROBINSONS LAND CORP (RLC): +83.63%
  2. UNIVERSAL ROBINA CORP (URC): +74.69%
  3. AYALA LAND INC (ALI): +74.47%
  4. BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS (BPI): +72.10%
  5. AYALA CORPORATION (AC): +66.24%
  6. MANILA WATER CO. (MWC): +64.95%
  7. MEGAWORLD CORP (MEG): +62.94%
  8. ALLIANCE GLOBAL INC. (AGI): +62.09%
  9. JG SUMMIT HOLDINGS (JGS): +57.06%
  10. FIRST GEN CORP (FGEN): +52.53%
  11. SM INVESTMENTS CORP (SM): +51.42%
  12. METROBANK (MBT): +50.11%
  13. INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINAL SERVICES (ICT): +39.62%

The seven (7) stocks that lost value in 2012 include:

  1. PHILEX MINING CO (PX): -28.15%
  2. PETRON CORP (PCOR): -16.98%
  3. SM DEVELOPMENT CORP (SMDC): -13.38%
  4. SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION (SMC): -9.76%
  5. BELLE CORP (BE): -4.33%
  6. GLOBE TELECOM (GLO): -3.62%
  7. PLDT (TEL): -0.47%

The complete listing of the 2012 and 2011 full-year returns of the 30 companies comprising the PSEi is as follows.

[TABLE=191]

You should read these other interesting articles:


1 thought on “Best PSE index (PSEi) stocks of 2012”

  1. This is often a wonderful short article with well-scripted, engaging information that may be whole of original and sensible views. Much within your informative content is in line with my way of thinking.Alice from franchise

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