Where to report scammers in the Philippines

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Don’t be duped by scammers who reside or operate in the Philippines! Report them to the authorities and send them to jail!

The Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has repeatedly warned the public against falling for “get-rich-quick” scams. In its site (www.sec.gov.ph), the SEC reported that more and more boiler-room operations have recently emerged, targeting potential investors who want to earn high return on their money.

Don’t be duped by scammers who reside or operate in the Philippines! Report them to the authorities and send them to jail!

The Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has repeatedly warned the public against falling for “get-rich-quick” scams.
On its site (www.sec.gov.ph), the SEC reported that more and more boiler-room operations have recently emerged, targeting potential investors who want to earn high return on their money.

Don’t be duped by scammers who reside or operate in the Philippines! Report them to the authorities and send them to jail!

The Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has repeatedly warned the public against falling for “get-rich-quick” scams. In its site (www.sec.gov.ph), the SEC reported that more and more boiler-room operations have recently emerged, targeting potential investors who want to earn high return on their money.

Don’t be duped by scammers who reside or operate in the Philippines! Report them to the authorities and send them to jail!

Sponsored Links

The Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has repeatedly warned the public against falling for “get-rich-quick” scams. In its site (www.sec.gov.ph), the SEC reported that more and more boiler-room operations have recently emerged, targeting potential investors who want to earn high return on their money.

Don’t be duped by scammers who reside or operate in the Philippines! Report them to the authorities and send them to jail!

The Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has repeatedly warned the public against falling for “get-rich-quick” scams. In its site (www.sec.gov.ph), the SEC reported that more and more boiler-room operations have recently emerged, targeting potential investors who want to earn high return on their money.

According to the SEC, if any person or persons approached or contacted you via email, phone, or any other means and offered you a ridiculously high return on your “investment” after a short period of time, protect yourself by asking for the following information first.

  1. Name of the person and the company making the offer;
  2. Address of the person and the company;
  3. Landline numbers of the person and the company (mobile phone numbers are difficult to trace); and
  4. SEC registration of the company stating they are eligible to take investments

If the person refused to give those information, better not to continue dealing with them. There’s a high chance the company and the investment program are a fraud.

Some additional things to remember:

  • Investment houses and financing companies with quasi-banking (QB) license and with SEC registered securities are the only ones allowed to offer investment instruments to more than 19 investors;
  • Only SEC registered persons (brokers/dealers/salesmen) may offer or sell registered securities to the public;
  • SEC company registration in itself DOES NOT automatically grant authority to sell investment instruments such as securities, bonds, commercial papers, etc. Here is a list of companies authorized by the SEC to accept investments from the public;
  • Don’t fall for people who give you promissory notes or post-dated checks as proof of your interest earnings. Those might be fake or contain insufficient funds. Scammers use this trick to show that they are supposedly genuine and paying.

If you encountered these people, report them to the:

SEC – Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Department (SEC-CED) at Phone No. (632)724-7650 or (632)727-2267 or the National Bureau of Investigation or the local police

The image below summarizes what the SEC wants you to do if you are faced in such a situation.

Report Scams in the Philippines

Don’t let scammers scam you. Protect yourself and know what to do.According to the SEC, if any person or persons approached or contacted you via email, phone, or any other means and offered you a ridiculously high return on your “investment” after a short period of time, protect yourself by asking for the following information first.

  1. Name of the person and the company making the offer;
  2. Address of the person and the company;
  3. Landline numbers of the person and the company (mobile phone numbers are difficult to trace); and
  4. SEC registration of the company stating they are eligible to take investments

If the person refused to give those information, better not to continue dealing with them. There’s a high chance the company and the investment program are a fraud.

Some additional things to remember:

  • Investment houses and financing companies with quasi-banking (QB) license and with SEC registered securities are the only ones allowed to offer investment instruments to more than 19 investors;
  • Only SEC registered persons (brokers/dealers/salesmen) may offer or sell registered securities to the public;
  • SEC company registration in itself DOES NOT automatically grant authority to sell investment instruments such as securities, bonds, commercial papers, etc. Here is a list of companies authorized by the SEC to accept investments from the public;
  • Don’t fall for people who give you promissory notes or post-dated checks as proof of your interest earnings. Those might be fake or contain insufficient funds. Scammers use this trick to show that they are supposedly genuine and paying.

If you encountered these people, report them to the:

SEC – Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Department (SEC-CED) at Phone No. (632)724-7650 or (632)727-2267 or the National Bureau of Investigation or the local police

Don’t let scammers scam you. Protect yourself and know what to do.

According to the SEC, if any person or persons approached or contacted you via email, phone, or any other means and offered you a ridiculously high return on your “investment” after a short period of time, protect yourself by asking for the following information first.

  1. Name of the person and the company making the offer;
  2. Address of the person and the company;
  3. Landline numbers of the person and the company (mobile phone numbers are difficult to trace); and
  4. SEC registration of the company stating they are eligible to take investments

If the person refused to give those information, better not to continue dealing with them. There’s a high chance the company and the investment program are a fraud.

Some additional things to remember:

  • Investment houses and financing companies with quasi-banking (QB) license and with SEC registered securities are the only ones allowed to offer investment instruments to more than 19 investors;
  • Only SEC registered persons (brokers/dealers/salesmen) may offer or sell registered securities to the public;
  • SEC company registration in itself DOES NOT automatically grant authority to sell investment instruments such as securities, bonds, commercial papers, etc. Here is a list of companies authorized by the SEC to accept investments from the public;
  • Don’t fall for people who give you promissory notes or post-dated checks as proof of your interest earnings. Those might be fake or contain insufficient funds. Scammers use this trick to show that they are supposedly genuine and paying.

If you encountered these people, report them to the:

SEC – Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Department (SEC-CED) at Phone No. (632)724-7650 or (632)727-2267 or the National Bureau of Investigation or the local police

The image below summarizes what the SEC wants you to do if you are faced in such a situation.

Report Scams in the Philippines

Don’t let scammers scam you. Protect yourself and know what to do.According to the SEC, if any person or persons approached or contacted you via email, phone, or any other means and offered you a ridiculously high return on your “investment” after a short period of time, protect yourself by asking for the following information first.

  1. Name of the person and the company making the offer;
  2. Address of the person and the company;
  3. Landline numbers of the person and the company (mobile phone numbers are difficult to trace); and
  4. SEC registration of the company stating they are eligible to take investments

If the person refused to give those information, better not to continue dealing with them. There’s a high chance the company and the investment program are a fraud.

Some additional things to remember:

  • Investment houses and financing companies with quasi-banking (QB) license and with SEC registered securities are the only ones allowed to offer investment instruments to more than 19 investors;
  • Only SEC registered persons (brokers/dealers/salesmen) may offer or sell registered securities to the public;
  • SEC company registration in itself DOES NOT automatically grant authority to sell investment instruments such as securities, bonds, commercial papers, etc. Here is a list of companies authorized by the SEC to accept investments from the public;
  • Don’t fall for people who give you promissory notes or post-dated checks as proof of your interest earnings. Those might be fake or contain insufficient funds. Scammers use this trick to show that they are supposedly genuine and paying.

If you encountered these people, report them to the:

SEC – Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Department (SEC-CED) at Phone No. (632)724-7650 or (632)727-2267 or the National Bureau of Investigation or the local police

The image below summarizes what the SEC wants you to do if you are faced in such a situation.

Report Scams in the Philippines

Don’t let scammers scam you. Protect yourself and know what to do.According to the SEC, if any person or persons approached or contacted you via email, phone, or any other means and offered you a ridiculously high return on your “investment” after a short period of time, protect yourself by asking for the following information first.

  1. Name of the person and the company making the offer;
  2. Address of the person and the company;
  3. Landline numbers of the person and the company (mobile phone numbers are difficult to trace); and
  4. SEC registration of the company stating they are eligible to take investments

If the person refused to give those information, better not to continue dealing with them. There’s a high chance the company and the investment program are a fraud.

Some additional things to remember:

  • Investment houses and financing companies with quasi-banking (QB) license and with SEC registered securities are the only ones allowed to offer investment instruments to more than 19 investors;
  • Only SEC registered persons (brokers/dealers/salesmen) may offer or sell registered securities to the public;
  • SEC company registration in itself DOES NOT automatically grant authority to sell investment instruments such as securities, bonds, commercial papers, etc. Here is a list of companies authorized by the SEC to accept investments from the public;
  • Don’t fall for people who give you promissory notes or post-dated checks as proof of your interest earnings. Those might be fake or contain insufficient funds. Scammers use this trick to show that they are supposedly genuine and paying.

If you encountered these people, report them to the:

SEC – Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement Department (SEC-CED) at Phone No. (632)724-7650 or (632)727-2267 or the National Bureau of Investigation or the local police

The image below summarizes what the SEC wants you to do if you are faced in such a situation.

Report Scams in the Philippines

Don’t let scammers scam you. Protect yourself and know what to do.

  • Luz Mercado

    Freddie S. Gonzales Jr. from Southern Leyte, Scammer. He sells in OLX, and Facebook. Dont buy from Him.SCAM SCAM SCAM. his iPhone products exist but they will not send it to you . it is a scam.

  • Luz Mercado

    Iguess kakilala nya din sila
    FB : JERO GONZALEZ
    OLX NAME: JEN
    CONSINEE: MARIA JENNICA BELISARIO

    FROM: DAGUPAN CITY PANGASINAN . Magkakasabwat silang lahat. Papadala nila as proof sa mga kakilala nila sa Pangasinan at Bulacan, then sa Visayas, Southern Leyte, Dagupan, Madami. yung proof na completed shipment, mga kasabwat nila yun.

  • jennifer castro

    I’m also a victim of JOSHUA ESPANOLA!
    6600 for the iphone 5, I was so naïve that time and mura din eh kaya go na.
    OLX un last dec.31, tried to visit the olx post pero wala na deleted na then matapang din to kasi may picture din xa sa fb. After ko ideposit ang money and texted him the confirmation he actually said (ok wait) then when I asked what time will u ship the item patay na un na di na nagreply ang taong to di na din matawagan then I decided to freeze the money however it was already withdrawn (10 mins after na deposit) its actually a lesson learned for me. never ever trust anyone.

  • butterpeanut

    Beware of this scammer. ELISEO CORPUZ, JR (or ELY CORPUZ)!

    OLX Seller who scammed me when I bought an item and asked me to deposit it via his Smart Money account. He’s selling camera on OLX.

    His details:
    BDO Smart Money Account 5299-6761-5092-3144 (Eliseo Corpuz Jr.)
    Contact numbers:09071934305/ 09171934315
    Supposed location is in Puerto Princesa, Palawan
    He’s on Facebook as “Ely Corpuz” (eliseocorpuzjr@gmail.com) – search for his account and report him so he won’t be able to dupe other people!!

    Best not to transact with anyone on OLX or any online websites to be safe!